Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Climatic drivers of retrogressive thaw slump activity and resulting sediment and carbon release to the nearshore zone of Herschel Island, Yukon Territory, Canada von Stefanie Weege

By: Weege, Stefanie [VerfasserIn].
Contributor(s): Lantuit, Hugues [AkademischeR BetreuerIn] | Universität Potsdam [Grad-verleihende Institution].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Potsdam 2016Description: 163 Seiten Illustrationen, Diagramme.Content type: Text Media type: ohne Hilfsmittel zu benutzen Carrier type: BandOther title: Einfluss des Klimas auf das Auftauen einer rückschreitenden Erosionsfront und die daraus resultierende Sediment- und Kohlenstofffreigabe in den Küstenbereich von Herschel Island, Kanada | Einfluss des Klimas auf das Auftauen einer rückschreitenden Erosionsfront und die daraus resultierende Sediment- und Kohlenstofffreigabe in den Küstenbereich von Herschel Island, Kanada [Übersetzung des Haupttitels].Subject(s): Erosion | Küste | Küstenprozesse | Permafrost | Arktis | KanadaGenre/Form: HochschulschriftOther classification: 38.42 | 38.49 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Table of Contents Abstract Kurzfassung Abbreviations and nomenclature 1. Introduction 2. Scientific Background 2.1. Permafrost 2.2.Retrogressive Thaw Slumps 2.3. Inputs of Freshwater, Sediment and Carbon into the Canadian Beaufort Sea 3. Study Area 3.1. Regional Setting: Yukon Coast and Herschel Island 3.2. Retrogressive Thaw Slumps 4. Material and Methods 4.1. Field Work 4.1.1. Terrain Photography 4.1.2. Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) 4.1.3. Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) 4.1.4. Micrometeorology 4.1.5. Discharge Measurement 4.1.6. Multiple Regression-Statistical Relationships between Micrometeorological Variables and Discharge 4.1.7. Sampling 4.2. Laboratory Analyses 4.2.1. Sedimentological Analyses 4.2.2. Hydrochemical Analyses 4.3. Fluxes of Sediment and (In-) Organic Matter 5. Results 5.1. Field Work 5.1.1. Terrain Photography 5.1.2. Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) 5.1.3. Light Detecting And Ranging (LiDAR) and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) 5.1.4. Micrometeorology 5.1.5. Discharge 5.1.6. Multiple Regression - Statistical Relationships between Micrometeorology and Discharge 5.2. Laboratory Analyses 5.2.1. Sedimentological Analyses 5.2.2. Hydrochemical Analyses 5.3. Fluxes of Sediment-meltwater 6. Discussion 6.1. Microclimatological and Geomorphological Factors Controlling Discharge 6.1.1. Diurnal Variations 6.1.2. Seasonal Variations 6.2. Contribution of Retrogressive Thaw Slumps to the Sediment Budget of the Yukon Coast 6.2.1. Origin of Outflow Material 6.2.2. Slump D in the Regional Context 6.2.3. Seasonal Sediment Budget Compilation for Slump D 6.2.4. Retrogressive Thaw Slump Occurrence along the Yukon Coast 6.2.5. Input to the Beaufort Sea 6.3. Projected Climatic Change and its Impact on Retrogressive Thaw Slump Outflow 6.4. Uncertainties and Limitations 6.5. Future Research 7. Conclusion 8. Appendix 8.1. Field Work 8.1.1. Slump D's northern headwall profile 8.1.2. Collinson Head slump 8.1.3. Herschel Island West Coast slump 8.1.4. Roland Bay slump 8.1.5. Kay Point slump 8.2. Laboratory Work 8.2.1. Volumetric Ice Content 8.2.2. Grain Size 8.3. Evolution of Slump D 8.3.1. Geo Eye satellite of Slump D 8.3.2. Aerial Oblique Photography of Slump D 8.3.3. LiDAR of Slump D 8.3.4. Time Lapse Photography of Slump D's Headwall 9. References 10. Financial and technical support 11. Acknowledgement - Danksagung
Dissertation note: Dissertation Universität Potsdam, Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät 2017 Summary: The Yukon Coast in Canada is an ice-rich permafrost coast and highly sensitive to changing environmental conditions. Retrogressive thaw slumps are a common thermoerosion feature along this coast, and develop through the thawing of exposed ice-rich permafrost on slopes and removal of accumulating debris. They contribute large amounts of sediment, including organic carbon and nitrogen, to the nearshore zone. The objective of this study was to 1) identify the climatic and geomorphological drivers of sediment-meltwater release, 2) quantify the amount of released meltwater, sediment, organic carbon and nitrogen, and 3) project the evolution of sediment-meltwater release of retrogressive thaw slumps in a changing future climate. The analysis is based on data collected over 18 days in July 2013 and 18 days in August 2012. A cut-throat flume was set up in the main sediment-meltwater channel of the largest retrogressive thaw slump on Herschel Island. In addition, two weather stations, one on top of the undisturbed tundra and one on the…
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Monographie ausleihbar Monographie ausleihbar AWI Potsdam
AWI Lesesaal
AWI G3-19-92460 (Browse shelf) Available 000647998
Total holds: 0

Dissertation Universität Potsdam, Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät 2017

Table of Contents
Abstract
Kurzfassung
Abbreviations and nomenclature
1. Introduction
2. Scientific Background
2.1. Permafrost
2.2.Retrogressive Thaw Slumps
2.3. Inputs of Freshwater, Sediment and Carbon into the Canadian Beaufort Sea
3. Study Area
3.1. Regional Setting: Yukon Coast and Herschel Island
3.2. Retrogressive Thaw Slumps
4. Material and Methods
4.1. Field Work
4.1.1. Terrain Photography
4.1.2. Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS)
4.1.3. Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and Digital Elevation Model (DEM)
4.1.4. Micrometeorology
4.1.5. Discharge Measurement
4.1.6. Multiple Regression-Statistical Relationships between Micrometeorological Variables and Discharge
4.1.7. Sampling
4.2. Laboratory Analyses
4.2.1. Sedimentological Analyses
4.2.2. Hydrochemical Analyses
4.3. Fluxes of Sediment and (In-) Organic Matter
5. Results
5.1. Field Work
5.1.1. Terrain Photography
5.1.2. Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS)
5.1.3. Light Detecting And Ranging (LiDAR) and Digital Elevation Model (DEM)
5.1.4. Micrometeorology
5.1.5. Discharge
5.1.6. Multiple Regression - Statistical Relationships between Micrometeorology and Discharge
5.2. Laboratory Analyses
5.2.1. Sedimentological Analyses
5.2.2. Hydrochemical Analyses
5.3. Fluxes of Sediment-meltwater
6. Discussion
6.1. Microclimatological and Geomorphological Factors Controlling Discharge
6.1.1. Diurnal Variations
6.1.2. Seasonal Variations
6.2. Contribution of Retrogressive Thaw Slumps to the Sediment Budget of the Yukon Coast
6.2.1. Origin of Outflow Material
6.2.2. Slump D in the Regional Context
6.2.3. Seasonal Sediment Budget Compilation for Slump D
6.2.4. Retrogressive Thaw Slump Occurrence along the Yukon Coast
6.2.5. Input to the Beaufort Sea
6.3. Projected Climatic Change and its Impact on Retrogressive Thaw Slump Outflow
6.4. Uncertainties and Limitations
6.5. Future Research
7. Conclusion
8. Appendix
8.1. Field Work
8.1.1. Slump D's northern headwall profile
8.1.2. Collinson Head slump
8.1.3. Herschel Island West Coast slump
8.1.4. Roland Bay slump
8.1.5. Kay Point slump
8.2. Laboratory Work
8.2.1. Volumetric Ice Content
8.2.2. Grain Size
8.3. Evolution of Slump D
8.3.1. Geo Eye satellite of Slump D
8.3.2. Aerial Oblique Photography of Slump D
8.3.3. LiDAR of Slump D
8.3.4. Time Lapse Photography of Slump D's Headwall
9. References
10. Financial and technical support
11. Acknowledgement - Danksagung

The Yukon Coast in Canada is an ice-rich permafrost coast and highly sensitive to changing environmental conditions. Retrogressive thaw slumps are a common thermoerosion feature along this coast, and develop through the thawing of exposed ice-rich permafrost on slopes and removal of accumulating debris. They contribute large amounts of sediment, including organic carbon and nitrogen, to the nearshore zone. The objective of this study was to 1) identify the climatic and geomorphological drivers of sediment-meltwater release, 2) quantify the amount of released meltwater, sediment, organic carbon and nitrogen, and 3) project the evolution of sediment-meltwater release of retrogressive thaw slumps in a changing future climate. The analysis is based on data collected over 18 days in July 2013 and 18 days in August 2012. A cut-throat flume was set up in the main sediment-meltwater channel of the largest retrogressive thaw slump on Herschel Island. In addition, two weather stations, one on top of the undisturbed tundra and one on the…

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha