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Properties of urea-doped ice in the CRREL test basin Ken-ichi Hirayama

By: Hirayama, Ken-ichi [VerfasserIn].
Contributor(s): Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory <Hanover, NH> [Herausgebendes Organ].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: CRREL Report 83-8.Set: Properties of urea-doped ice in the CRREL test basinPublisher: Hanover, New Hampshire U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory 1983Description: vii, 53 Seiten Illustrationen.Content type: Text Media type: ohne Hilfsmittel zu benutzen Carrier type: BandSubject(s): Hydraulik | Modellversuche | EisGenre/Form: ForschungsberichtOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
CONTENTS Abstract Preface Nomenclature Introduction Experimental facility and procedures Ice test basin Ice growth procedure Measurements Ice growth and structure Ice thickness distribution Ice growth during freeze-up Ice growth during warm-up Structure of urea-doped ice Mechanical properties of urea-doped ice Introductory remarks Model of a two-layer elastic material Properties of urea-doped ice during freeze-up Properties of urea-doped ice during warm-up Applications to test program scheduling Summary and conclusions Literature cited Appendix A: Results of ice thickness measurements for various growth conditions Appendix B: Properties of untempered ice Appendix C: Properties of tempered ice
Summary: In the course of model tests with urea-doped ice in the CRREL Ice Engineering Facility test basin, the growth process and the physical and mechanical properties of the model ice were investigated. The parameters which were varied were: urea concentration in the tank water, air temperature during growth, growth duration, and tempering time. Uniformity of ice thickness and ice mechanical properties over the whole tank area were found to be satisfactory. The structure of the urea-doped ice was found to be similar to that of the ice except for a relatively thick incubation layer over a dendritic bottom layer. Empirical relationships were established between: ice thickness and negative degree-hours; mechanical properties and growth temperature, urea concentration, and ice thickness; and reduction in mechanical properties and tempting time. The results of the study are presented in charts which permit reliable scheduling of model tests with required ice thickness and ice flexural strength.
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CONTENTS
Abstract
Preface
Nomenclature
Introduction
Experimental facility and procedures
Ice test basin
Ice growth procedure
Measurements
Ice growth and structure
Ice thickness distribution
Ice growth during freeze-up
Ice growth during warm-up
Structure of urea-doped ice
Mechanical properties of urea-doped ice
Introductory remarks
Model of a two-layer elastic material
Properties of urea-doped ice during freeze-up
Properties of urea-doped ice during warm-up
Applications to test program scheduling
Summary and conclusions
Literature cited
Appendix A: Results of ice thickness measurements for various growth conditions
Appendix B: Properties of untempered ice
Appendix C: Properties of tempered ice

In the course of model tests with urea-doped ice in the CRREL Ice Engineering Facility test basin, the growth process and the physical and mechanical properties of the model ice were investigated. The parameters which were varied were: urea concentration in the tank water, air temperature during growth, growth duration, and tempering time. Uniformity of ice thickness and ice mechanical properties over the whole tank area were found to be satisfactory. The structure of the urea-doped ice was found to be similar to that of the ice except for a relatively thick incubation layer over a dendritic bottom layer. Empirical relationships were established between: ice thickness and negative degree-hours; mechanical properties and growth temperature, urea concentration, and ice thickness; and reduction in mechanical properties and tempting time. The results of the study are presented in charts which permit reliable scheduling of model tests with required ice thickness and ice flexural strength.

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