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Window performance in extreme cold S. N. Flanders, J. S. Buska and S. A. Barrett

By: Flanders, Stephen N [VerfasserIn].
Contributor(s): Buska, J. S [VerfasserIn] | Barrett, S. A [VerfasserIn] | Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory <Hanover, NH> [Herausgebendes Organ].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: CRREL Report 82-38.Set: Window performance in extreme coldPublisher: Hanover, NH U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory 1982Description: v, 26 Seiten Illustrationen.Content type: Text Media type: ohne Hilfsmittel zu benutzen Carrier type: BandSubject(s): kalte Zone | energiebewusstes Bauen | Wärmeaustausch | Kondensation | Alaska | Wärmedämmung | FensterGenre/Form: ForschungsberichtOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Contents Abstract Preface Nomenclature Introduction Previous work in cold weather window performance Investigation Data acquisition and analysis Modeling the window thermal regime Moisture and ice observations Airtightness testing and analysis Annual heat loss from air leakage Results and conclusions Moisture on windows Airtightness Airtightness economics Recommendations for windows in extreme cold Airtightness Multiple glazing Literature cited Appendix A: Moisture levels and airtightness Appendix B: Dewpoint data Appendix C: Sample observations of icing
Summary: Extreme cold causes heavy buildup of frost, ice and condensation on many windows. It also increases the incentive for improving the airtightness of windows against heat loss. Our study shows that tightening specifications for Alaskan windows to permit only 30% of the air leakage allowed by current American airtightness standards is economically attractive. We also recommend triple glazing in much of Alaska to avoid window icing in homes and barracks. We base our conclusions on a two-year field study of Alaskan military bases that included recording humidity and temperature data, observing moisture accumulation on windows and measuring airtightness with a fan pressurization device.
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Contents
Abstract
Preface
Nomenclature
Introduction
Previous work in cold weather window performance
Investigation
Data acquisition and analysis
Modeling the window thermal regime
Moisture and ice observations
Airtightness testing and analysis
Annual heat loss from air leakage
Results and conclusions
Moisture on windows
Airtightness
Airtightness economics
Recommendations for windows in extreme cold
Airtightness
Multiple glazing
Literature cited
Appendix A: Moisture levels and airtightness
Appendix B: Dewpoint data
Appendix C: Sample observations of icing

Extreme cold causes heavy buildup of frost, ice and condensation on many windows. It also increases the incentive for improving the airtightness of windows against heat loss. Our study shows that tightening specifications for Alaskan windows to permit only 30% of the air leakage allowed by current American airtightness standards is economically attractive. We also recommend triple glazing in much of Alaska to avoid window icing in homes and barracks. We base our conclusions on a two-year field study of Alaskan military bases that included recording humidity and temperature data, observing moisture accumulation on windows and measuring airtightness with a fan pressurization device.

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