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Ice sheet retention structures Roscoe E. Perham

By: Perham, Roscoe E [VerfasserIn].
Contributor(s): Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory <Hanover, NH> [Herausgebendes Organ].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: CRREL Report 83-30.Set: Ice sheet retention structuresPublisher: Hanover, NH U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory 1983Description: iv, 39 Seiten Illustrationen 1 Beilage.Content type: Text Media type: ohne Hilfsmittel zu benutzen Carrier type: BandSubject(s): Eis | Eisdecke | SpeicherungGenre/Form: ForschungsberichtOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Contents Abstract Preface Introduction Natural ice sheets Choosing an ice control structure Flexible structures Ice booms Frazil collector lines Fence booms Rigid or semirigid structures Pier-mounted booms Stone groins Artificial islands Removable gravity structures Timber cribs Weirs Pilings and dolphins Structures built for other purposes Hydroelectric dams Wicket dams Light piers and towers Bridge piers Breakwaters Ice control not using Structures Channel improvements Ice sheet tying Ice sheet bridges Conclusions Literature cited Appendix A: Ice control structure
Summary: Ice sheets are formed and retained in several ways in nature, and an understanding of these factors is needed before most structures can be successfully applied. Many ice sheet retention structures float and are somewhat flexible; others are fixed and rigid or semirigid. An example of the former is the Lake Erie ice boom and of the latter, the Montreal ice control structure. Ice sheet retention technology is changing. The use of timber cribs is gradually but not totally giving way to sheet steel pilings and concrete cells. New structures and applications are being tried but with caution. Ice-hydraulic analyses are helpful in predicting the effects of structures and channel modifications on ice cover formation and retention. Often, varying the flow rate in a particular system at the proper time will make the difference between whether a structure will or will not retain ice. The structure, however, invariably adds reliability to the sheet ice retention process.
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Contents
Abstract
Preface
Introduction
Natural ice sheets
Choosing an ice control structure
Flexible structures
Ice booms
Frazil collector lines
Fence booms
Rigid or semirigid structures
Pier-mounted booms
Stone groins
Artificial islands
Removable gravity structures
Timber cribs
Weirs
Pilings and dolphins
Structures built for other purposes
Hydroelectric dams
Wicket dams
Light piers and towers
Bridge piers
Breakwaters
Ice control not using Structures
Channel improvements
Ice sheet tying
Ice sheet bridges
Conclusions
Literature cited
Appendix A: Ice control structure

Ice sheets are formed and retained in several ways in nature, and an understanding of these factors is needed before most structures can be successfully applied. Many ice sheet retention structures float and are somewhat flexible; others are fixed and rigid or semirigid. An example of the former is the Lake Erie ice boom and of the latter, the Montreal ice control structure. Ice sheet retention technology is changing. The use of timber cribs is gradually but not totally giving way to sheet steel pilings and concrete cells. New structures and applications are being tried but with caution. Ice-hydraulic analyses are helpful in predicting the effects of structures and channel modifications on ice cover formation and retention. Often, varying the flow rate in a particular system at the proper time will make the difference between whether a structure will or will not retain ice. The structure, however, invariably adds reliability to the sheet ice retention process.

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